Tonton Online Recipes

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Huwebes, Abril 2, 2015

Beef Enchilada Pasta Bake

Walang komento :
Takeout becomes a thing of the past when you've got a few staples on hand to bake into a zesty, comforting meal. Just brown, stir and bake, and you've got dinner. ingredients Kosher salt 1/2 pound medium shells 1 pound ground beef One 19-ounce can enchilada sauce 1 packed cup shredded Mexican cheese blend directions Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Cook the shells until al dente, about 7 minutes. Meanwhile, brown the beef and 1/8 teaspoon salt in a large skillet over medium-high heat, breaking up the beef with the back of a wooden spoon, until the beef is no longer pink, about 5 minutes. Drain the fat and return the beef to the skillet. Drain the pasta and add to the skillet. Stir in the enchilada sauce and 3/4 cup of the cheese and mix together. Pour into a 1 1/2-quart baking dish. Sprinkle the remaining 1/4 cup cheese over top. Bake until the sauce bubbles and the pasta is lightly browned, about 15 minutes. Non-Restaurant Food-Server Job Duties Food-servers who work in a non-restaurant environment may be employed at such places as hospitals and hotel. They use carts or trays to carry and deliver foods, beverages, condiments and utensils. Duties may also include cleaning dishes and utensils. They must also ensure that the right foods are delivered to the correct recipients and according to any instructions or restrictions. Duties might also include preparing food items, such as appetizers, salads, sandwiches or soups. Responsibilities may also include restocking ice, supplies and condiments. Preparing and delivering customers' bills and accepting customers' payments are also common. Additional Qualifications Food-server job qualifications often include holding a high school diploma, though some institutions do not require this. Employers typically provide on-the-job training. Some employers may prefer prior experience or other training to formal schooling. Food-servers must be able to work in a team. They should possess a professional and neat appearance and be able to communicate effectively with customers. Food-servers are expected to provide courteous service to their customers; they might use verbal and written communication techniques. Efficiency is also necessary. Food-servers also need to possess a good memory, as they need to retain customers' orders along with faces and names. Knowledge of foreign languages is useful. Food-servers also need to have familiarity of food safety, food service regulations, health regulations and proper sanitation practices. They must have an awareness of food-handling rules. Employment Outlook and Salary Information Employment growth of 12% was predicted for food and beverage serving and related workers, from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In 2012, the annual median salary for food preparation and serving related occupations was $18,930, the BLS reported. Food Safety: Serving Topic Overview You can help prevent foodborne illness by taking precautions when serving food. Keep hot foods hot [60°C (140°F) or above] and cold foods cold [4°C (40°F) or below]. Never leave meat, poultry, eggs, fish, or shellfish (raw or cooked) at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the temperature outdoors is above 32°C (90°F), refrigerate within 1 hour. (This is often the case during summer picnics.) Chill leftovers as soon as you finish eating. Store leftovers in small, shallow containers to cool rapidly. Do not reheat food that is contaminated. Reheating does not make it safe. If you are not sure how long a food has been in the refrigerator, throw it out. If you are not sure whether a food is safe, throw it out. When you eat out, be sure that meat is cooked thoroughly and that foods that should be refrigerated, such as puddings and cold cuts, are served cold. Also pay attention to the restaurant environment. If the tables, dinnerware, and washrooms look dirty, the kitchen may be too. It has been firmly established that low maternal intake of folate creates a fetal nutrient deficiency that leads to incomplete development of the fetal nervous system. The critical period for maternal folate intake seems to be the first few weeks of fetal development. Ensuring adequate folate intake during this period is a vexing problem because the fact of pregnancy may not be known even to the mother at this early stage. The confluence of the problem of getting women of childbearing age to eat an adequate amount of folate with the observation that adequate folate helps prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) led to the addition of folic acid to grain foods in the US food supply starting in 1998.1 This strategy has been effective in getting folate to young potential mothers and also in reducing NTDs.2 However, the strategy enhances an otherwise nutrient-poor food (refined grain foods are the primary focus of fortification; whole grain foods are naturally rich in folate) and increases folic acid in purified form to the total population. Eat staple foods with every meal Staple foods should make up the largest part of a meal. These foods are relatively cheap and supply a good amount of energy and some protein. Staples include cereals (such as rice, maize, millet, sorghum, wheat and barley), starchy roots (such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and yams) and starchy fruit (such as plantains). However, staple foods are not enough to provide all the nutrients the body needs. Other foods must be eaten to provide additional energy, proteins and micronutrients. Eat legumes if possible every day These foods provide a person with the proteins needed to develop and repair the body and also to build up strong muscles. They are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fibre and help to keep the immune system active. Legumes include beans, peas, lentils, groundnuts (including peanut butter) and soybeans. When eaten with staple foods the quality of protein is increased. Legumes are a cheaper protein source than animal foods, such as beef and chicken, and should be eaten every day, if possible. Eat animal and milk products regularly Foods from animals and fish should also be eaten as often as you can afford them. They supply good-quality proteins, vitamins and minerals and extra energy. They will help to strengthen muscles and the immune system. These foods include all forms of meat, poultry (birds), fish, eggs and dairy products such as milk, sour milk, buttermilk, yoghurt and cheese. If insects, such as caterpillars or grasshoppers, are part of your diet, they also provide good nutrients. Eat vegetables and fruit every day Vegetables and fruit are an important part of a healthy and balanced meal. They supply the vitamins and minerals that keep the body functioning and the immune system strong. These foods are especially important for people living with HIV/AIDS to fight infection. Eat a wide variety as each one provides different vitamins and minerals.

Cincinnati Chili

Walang komento :
Cincinnati chili, sometimes referred to as 5-way chili, is served layered with spaghetti, cheese, onion and beans. Equally good, our simplified version can be prepared in minutes making it the perfect weeknight meal. ingredients 1/2 pound spaghetti 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 cup chopped onion 1 pound ground beef 1-ounce package chili seasoning 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon One 16-ounce can tomato sauce One 14-ounce can black or kidney beans, drained and rinsed 1 cup beef broth directions In a large saucepan set over high heat bring 2 quarts salted water to a boil, covered. Add pasta and cook according to package directions. Heat oil in a 12-inch deep skillet over medium-high heat until hot. Add onion. Cook, stirring, 2 minutes. Add beef and cook until no longer pink. Stir in chili seasoning and cinnamon. Cook, stirring, 1 minute. Add tomato sauce, black beans and broth. Bring to boil, reduce heat to medium-low and simmer 10 minutes. Serve over pasta. Non-Restaurant Food-Server Job Duties Food-servers who work in a non-restaurant environment may be employed at such places as hospitals and hotel. They use carts or trays to carry and deliver foods, beverages, condiments and utensils. Duties may also include cleaning dishes and utensils. They must also ensure that the right foods are delivered to the correct recipients and according to any instructions or restrictions. Duties might also include preparing food items, such as appetizers, salads, sandwiches or soups. Responsibilities may also include restocking ice, supplies and condiments. Preparing and delivering customers' bills and accepting customers' payments are also common. Additional Qualifications Food-server job qualifications often include holding a high school diploma, though some institutions do not require this. Employers typically provide on-the-job training. Some employers may prefer prior experience or other training to formal schooling. Food-servers must be able to work in a team. They should possess a professional and neat appearance and be able to communicate effectively with customers. Food-servers are expected to provide courteous service to their customers; they might use verbal and written communication techniques. Efficiency is also necessary. Food-servers also need to possess a good memory, as they need to retain customers' orders along with faces and names. Knowledge of foreign languages is useful. Food-servers also need to have familiarity of food safety, food service regulations, health regulations and proper sanitation practices. They must have an awareness of food-handling rules. Employment Outlook and Salary Information Employment growth of 12% was predicted for food and beverage serving and related workers, from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In 2012, the annual median salary for food preparation and serving related occupations was $18,930, the BLS reported. Food Safety: Serving Topic Overview You can help prevent foodborne illness by taking precautions when serving food. Keep hot foods hot [60°C (140°F) or above] and cold foods cold [4°C (40°F) or below]. Never leave meat, poultry, eggs, fish, or shellfish (raw or cooked) at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the temperature outdoors is above 32°C (90°F), refrigerate within 1 hour. (This is often the case during summer picnics.) Chill leftovers as soon as you finish eating. Store leftovers in small, shallow containers to cool rapidly. Do not reheat food that is contaminated. Reheating does not make it safe. If you are not sure how long a food has been in the refrigerator, throw it out. If you are not sure whether a food is safe, throw it out. When you eat out, be sure that meat is cooked thoroughly and that foods that should be refrigerated, such as puddings and cold cuts, are served cold. Also pay attention to the restaurant environment. If the tables, dinnerware, and washrooms look dirty, the kitchen may be too. It has been firmly established that low maternal intake of folate creates a fetal nutrient deficiency that leads to incomplete development of the fetal nervous system. The critical period for maternal folate intake seems to be the first few weeks of fetal development. Ensuring adequate folate intake during this period is a vexing problem because the fact of pregnancy may not be known even to the mother at this early stage. The confluence of the problem of getting women of childbearing age to eat an adequate amount of folate with the observation that adequate folate helps prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) led to the addition of folic acid to grain foods in the US food supply starting in 1998.1 This strategy has been effective in getting folate to young potential mothers and also in reducing NTDs.2 However, the strategy enhances an otherwise nutrient-poor food (refined grain foods are the primary focus of fortification; whole grain foods are naturally rich in folate) and increases folic acid in purified form to the total population. Eat staple foods with every meal Staple foods should make up the largest part of a meal. These foods are relatively cheap and supply a good amount of energy and some protein. Staples include cereals (such as rice, maize, millet, sorghum, wheat and barley), starchy roots (such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and yams) and starchy fruit (such as plantains). However, staple foods are not enough to provide all the nutrients the body needs. Other foods must be eaten to provide additional energy, proteins and micronutrients. Eat legumes if possible every day These foods provide a person with the proteins needed to develop and repair the body and also to build up strong muscles. They are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fibre and help to keep the immune system active. Legumes include beans, peas, lentils, groundnuts (including peanut butter) and soybeans. When eaten with staple foods the quality of protein is increased. Legumes are a cheaper protein source than animal foods, such as beef and chicken, and should be eaten every day, if possible. Eat animal and milk products regularly Foods from animals and fish should also be eaten as often as you can afford them. They supply good-quality proteins, vitamins and minerals and extra energy. They will help to strengthen muscles and the immune system. These foods include all forms of meat, poultry (birds), fish, eggs and dairy products such as milk, sour milk, buttermilk, yoghurt and cheese. If insects, such as caterpillars or grasshoppers, are part of your diet, they also provide good nutrients. Eat vegetables and fruit every day Vegetables and fruit are an important part of a healthy and balanced meal. They supply the vitamins and minerals that keep the body functioning and the immune system strong. These foods are especially important for people living with HIV/AIDS to fight infection. Eat a wide variety as each one provides different vitamins and minerals.

Beef and Beer Chili

Walang komento :
Beer adds depth of flavor to any dish. Tasting slightly earthy and nutty, the addition of beer to soups and stews makes them taste like they’ve been simmering for hours. ingredients 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 cup chopped onion 1 pound ground beef One 1-ounce package chili seasoning One 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes, drained One 15-ounce kidney beans, drained and rinsed One 4.5-ounce can chopped green chilies, drained 1 cup beer directions Heat oil in a 12-inch deep skillet over medium-high heat until hot. Add onion and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add beef and cook until no longer pink. Stir in chili seasoning and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add tomatoes, beans, beer and green chilies. Bring to a boil and simmer 15 minutes, or until liquid has reduced to about 1/3 cup. Non-Restaurant Food-Server Job Duties Food-servers who work in a non-restaurant environment may be employed at such places as hospitals and hotel. They use carts or trays to carry and deliver foods, beverages, condiments and utensils. Duties may also include cleaning dishes and utensils. They must also ensure that the right foods are delivered to the correct recipients and according to any instructions or restrictions. Duties might also include preparing food items, such as appetizers, salads, sandwiches or soups. Responsibilities may also include restocking ice, supplies and condiments. Preparing and delivering customers' bills and accepting customers' payments are also common. Additional Qualifications Food-server job qualifications often include holding a high school diploma, though some institutions do not require this. Employers typically provide on-the-job training. Some employers may prefer prior experience or other training to formal schooling. Food-servers must be able to work in a team. They should possess a professional and neat appearance and be able to communicate effectively with customers. Food-servers are expected to provide courteous service to their customers; they might use verbal and written communication techniques. Efficiency is also necessary. Food-servers also need to possess a good memory, as they need to retain customers' orders along with faces and names. Knowledge of foreign languages is useful. Food-servers also need to have familiarity of food safety, food service regulations, health regulations and proper sanitation practices. They must have an awareness of food-handling rules. Employment Outlook and Salary Information Employment growth of 12% was predicted for food and beverage serving and related workers, from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In 2012, the annual median salary for food preparation and serving related occupations was $18,930, the BLS reported. Food Safety: Serving Topic Overview You can help prevent foodborne illness by taking precautions when serving food. Keep hot foods hot [60°C (140°F) or above] and cold foods cold [4°C (40°F) or below]. Never leave meat, poultry, eggs, fish, or shellfish (raw or cooked) at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the temperature outdoors is above 32°C (90°F), refrigerate within 1 hour. (This is often the case during summer picnics.) Chill leftovers as soon as you finish eating. Store leftovers in small, shallow containers to cool rapidly. Do not reheat food that is contaminated. Reheating does not make it safe. If you are not sure how long a food has been in the refrigerator, throw it out. If you are not sure whether a food is safe, throw it out. When you eat out, be sure that meat is cooked thoroughly and that foods that should be refrigerated, such as puddings and cold cuts, are served cold. Also pay attention to the restaurant environment. If the tables, dinnerware, and washrooms look dirty, the kitchen may be too. It has been firmly established that low maternal intake of folate creates a fetal nutrient deficiency that leads to incomplete development of the fetal nervous system. The critical period for maternal folate intake seems to be the first few weeks of fetal development. Ensuring adequate folate intake during this period is a vexing problem because the fact of pregnancy may not be known even to the mother at this early stage. The confluence of the problem of getting women of childbearing age to eat an adequate amount of folate with the observation that adequate folate helps prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) led to the addition of folic acid to grain foods in the US food supply starting in 1998.1 This strategy has been effective in getting folate to young potential mothers and also in reducing NTDs.2 However, the strategy enhances an otherwise nutrient-poor food (refined grain foods are the primary focus of fortification; whole grain foods are naturally rich in folate) and increases folic acid in purified form to the total population. Eat staple foods with every meal Staple foods should make up the largest part of a meal. These foods are relatively cheap and supply a good amount of energy and some protein. Staples include cereals (such as rice, maize, millet, sorghum, wheat and barley), starchy roots (such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and yams) and starchy fruit (such as plantains). However, staple foods are not enough to provide all the nutrients the body needs. Other foods must be eaten to provide additional energy, proteins and micronutrients. Eat legumes if possible every day These foods provide a person with the proteins needed to develop and repair the body and also to build up strong muscles. They are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fibre and help to keep the immune system active. Legumes include beans, peas, lentils, groundnuts (including peanut butter) and soybeans. When eaten with staple foods the quality of protein is increased. Legumes are a cheaper protein source than animal foods, such as beef and chicken, and should be eaten every day, if possible. Eat animal and milk products regularly Foods from animals and fish should also be eaten as often as you can afford them. They supply good-quality proteins, vitamins and minerals and extra energy. They will help to strengthen muscles and the immune system. These foods include all forms of meat, poultry (birds), fish, eggs and dairy products such as milk, sour milk, buttermilk, yoghurt and cheese. If insects, such as caterpillars or grasshoppers, are part of your diet, they also provide good nutrients. Eat vegetables and fruit every day Vegetables and fruit are an important part of a healthy and balanced meal. They supply the vitamins and minerals that keep the body functioning and the immune system strong. These foods are especially important for people living with HIV/AIDS to fight infection. Eat a wide variety as each one provides different vitamins and minerals.

Retro Hot Chicken Salad

Walang komento :
Lighter in calories but no less tasty, this retro chicken salad can be put together in minutes. ingredients 1 cup low-fat mayonnaise 1/2 cup reduced-fat sour cream 3 cups cooked shredded chicken 1 cup diced celery One 8-ounce can water chestnuts, drained and chopped 1 cup grated sharp cheddar 1/2 cup sliced scallion 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1 cup crushed baked potato chips, unsweetened corn flakes or crackers directions Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Coat a 9 x 13-inch baking pan with cooking spray. Whisk together mayonnaise and sour cream in a small bowl. In another bowl, combine chicken, celery, water chestnuts, cheddar, scallion, salt and pepper. Add mayonnaise mixture and gently toss to combine. Transfer to baking pan. Sprinkle with chips. Bake 20-25 minutes, or until bubbling. Non-Restaurant Food-Server Job Duties Food-servers who work in a non-restaurant environment may be employed at such places as hospitals and hotel. They use carts or trays to carry and deliver foods, beverages, condiments and utensils. Duties may also include cleaning dishes and utensils. They must also ensure that the right foods are delivered to the correct recipients and according to any instructions or restrictions. Duties might also include preparing food items, such as appetizers, salads, sandwiches or soups. Responsibilities may also include restocking ice, supplies and condiments. Preparing and delivering customers' bills and accepting customers' payments are also common. Additional Qualifications Food-server job qualifications often include holding a high school diploma, though some institutions do not require this. Employers typically provide on-the-job training. Some employers may prefer prior experience or other training to formal schooling. Food-servers must be able to work in a team. They should possess a professional and neat appearance and be able to communicate effectively with customers. Food-servers are expected to provide courteous service to their customers; they might use verbal and written communication techniques. Efficiency is also necessary. Food-servers also need to possess a good memory, as they need to retain customers' orders along with faces and names. Knowledge of foreign languages is useful. Food-servers also need to have familiarity of food safety, food service regulations, health regulations and proper sanitation practices. They must have an awareness of food-handling rules. Employment Outlook and Salary Information Employment growth of 12% was predicted for food and beverage serving and related workers, from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In 2012, the annual median salary for food preparation and serving related occupations was $18,930, the BLS reported. Food Safety: Serving Topic Overview You can help prevent foodborne illness by taking precautions when serving food. Keep hot foods hot [60°C (140°F) or above] and cold foods cold [4°C (40°F) or below]. Never leave meat, poultry, eggs, fish, or shellfish (raw or cooked) at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the temperature outdoors is above 32°C (90°F), refrigerate within 1 hour. (This is often the case during summer picnics.) Chill leftovers as soon as you finish eating. Store leftovers in small, shallow containers to cool rapidly. Do not reheat food that is contaminated. Reheating does not make it safe. If you are not sure how long a food has been in the refrigerator, throw it out. If you are not sure whether a food is safe, throw it out. When you eat out, be sure that meat is cooked thoroughly and that foods that should be refrigerated, such as puddings and cold cuts, are served cold. Also pay attention to the restaurant environment. If the tables, dinnerware, and washrooms look dirty, the kitchen may be too. It has been firmly established that low maternal intake of folate creates a fetal nutrient deficiency that leads to incomplete development of the fetal nervous system. The critical period for maternal folate intake seems to be the first few weeks of fetal development. Ensuring adequate folate intake during this period is a vexing problem because the fact of pregnancy may not be known even to the mother at this early stage. The confluence of the problem of getting women of childbearing age to eat an adequate amount of folate with the observation that adequate folate helps prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) led to the addition of folic acid to grain foods in the US food supply starting in 1998.1 This strategy has been effective in getting folate to young potential mothers and also in reducing NTDs.2 However, the strategy enhances an otherwise nutrient-poor food (refined grain foods are the primary focus of fortification; whole grain foods are naturally rich in folate) and increases folic acid in purified form to the total population. Eat staple foods with every meal Staple foods should make up the largest part of a meal. These foods are relatively cheap and supply a good amount of energy and some protein. Staples include cereals (such as rice, maize, millet, sorghum, wheat and barley), starchy roots (such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and yams) and starchy fruit (such as plantains). However, staple foods are not enough to provide all the nutrients the body needs. Other foods must be eaten to provide additional energy, proteins and micronutrients. Eat legumes if possible every day These foods provide a person with the proteins needed to develop and repair the body and also to build up strong muscles. They are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fibre and help to keep the immune system active. Legumes include beans, peas, lentils, groundnuts (including peanut butter) and soybeans. When eaten with staple foods the quality of protein is increased. Legumes are a cheaper protein source than animal foods, such as beef and chicken, and should be eaten every day, if possible. Eat animal and milk products regularly Foods from animals and fish should also be eaten as often as you can afford them. They supply good-quality proteins, vitamins and minerals and extra energy. They will help to strengthen muscles and the immune system. These foods include all forms of meat, poultry (birds), fish, eggs and dairy products such as milk, sour milk, buttermilk, yoghurt and cheese. If insects, such as caterpillars or grasshoppers, are part of your diet, they also provide good nutrients. Eat vegetables and fruit every day Vegetables and fruit are an important part of a healthy and balanced meal. They supply the vitamins and minerals that keep the body functioning and the immune system strong. These foods are especially important for people living with HIV/AIDS to fight infection. Eat a wide variety as each one provides different vitamins and minerals.

Turkey Meatballs with Parsley and Lemon

Walang komento :
Homemade meatballs in minutes! These delicious morsels are very versatile. Serve them over premade polenta, your favorite pasta or on crusty bread for the best-ever meatball hero. ingredients 4 cups store-bought marinara sauce 1 pound ground turkey 1/2 cup grated Romano cheese 1/3 cup dry breadcrumbs 2/3 cup thinly sliced scallion 1 egg 1/2 cup minced parsley, divided 11/2 tablespoons grated lemon peel 1/2 teaspoon salt directions In a large deep skillet or shallow saucepan bring the marinara sauce to a simmer over medium heat. In a bowl combine turkey, Romano cheese, breadcrumbs, scallion, egg, half the parsley, 1 1/2 teaspoons of the lemon peel and the salt. With dampened hands form the mixture into 20 golf-size balls. Add meatballs to marinara sauce and simmer, covered, 12 to 15 minutes, or until cooked through. In a bowl combine the remaining parsley and the lemon peel. Sprinkle over meatballs. Serve meatballs over premade polenta, if desired. Accompany with additional Romano cheese. Non-Restaurant Food-Server Job Duties Food-servers who work in a non-restaurant environment may be employed at such places as hospitals and hotel. They use carts or trays to carry and deliver foods, beverages, condiments and utensils. Duties may also include cleaning dishes and utensils. They must also ensure that the right foods are delivered to the correct recipients and according to any instructions or restrictions. Duties might also include preparing food items, such as appetizers, salads, sandwiches or soups. Responsibilities may also include restocking ice, supplies and condiments. Preparing and delivering customers' bills and accepting customers' payments are also common. Additional Qualifications Food-server job qualifications often include holding a high school diploma, though some institutions do not require this. Employers typically provide on-the-job training. Some employers may prefer prior experience or other training to formal schooling. Food-servers must be able to work in a team. They should possess a professional and neat appearance and be able to communicate effectively with customers. Food-servers are expected to provide courteous service to their customers; they might use verbal and written communication techniques. Efficiency is also necessary. Food-servers also need to possess a good memory, as they need to retain customers' orders along with faces and names. Knowledge of foreign languages is useful. Food-servers also need to have familiarity of food safety, food service regulations, health regulations and proper sanitation practices. They must have an awareness of food-handling rules. Employment Outlook and Salary Information Employment growth of 12% was predicted for food and beverage serving and related workers, from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In 2012, the annual median salary for food preparation and serving related occupations was $18,930, the BLS reported. Food Safety: Serving Topic Overview You can help prevent foodborne illness by taking precautions when serving food. Keep hot foods hot [60°C (140°F) or above] and cold foods cold [4°C (40°F) or below]. Never leave meat, poultry, eggs, fish, or shellfish (raw or cooked) at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the temperature outdoors is above 32°C (90°F), refrigerate within 1 hour. (This is often the case during summer picnics.) Chill leftovers as soon as you finish eating. Store leftovers in small, shallow containers to cool rapidly. Do not reheat food that is contaminated. Reheating does not make it safe. If you are not sure how long a food has been in the refrigerator, throw it out. If you are not sure whether a food is safe, throw it out. When you eat out, be sure that meat is cooked thoroughly and that foods that should be refrigerated, such as puddings and cold cuts, are served cold. Also pay attention to the restaurant environment. If the tables, dinnerware, and washrooms look dirty, the kitchen may be too. It has been firmly established that low maternal intake of folate creates a fetal nutrient deficiency that leads to incomplete development of the fetal nervous system. The critical period for maternal folate intake seems to be the first few weeks of fetal development. Ensuring adequate folate intake during this period is a vexing problem because the fact of pregnancy may not be known even to the mother at this early stage. The confluence of the problem of getting women of childbearing age to eat an adequate amount of folate with the observation that adequate folate helps prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) led to the addition of folic acid to grain foods in the US food supply starting in 1998.1 This strategy has been effective in getting folate to young potential mothers and also in reducing NTDs.2 However, the strategy enhances an otherwise nutrient-poor food (refined grain foods are the primary focus of fortification; whole grain foods are naturally rich in folate) and increases folic acid in purified form to the total population. Eat staple foods with every meal Staple foods should make up the largest part of a meal. These foods are relatively cheap and supply a good amount of energy and some protein. Staples include cereals (such as rice, maize, millet, sorghum, wheat and barley), starchy roots (such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and yams) and starchy fruit (such as plantains). However, staple foods are not enough to provide all the nutrients the body needs. Other foods must be eaten to provide additional energy, proteins and micronutrients. Eat legumes if possible every day These foods provide a person with the proteins needed to develop and repair the body and also to build up strong muscles. They are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fibre and help to keep the immune system active. Legumes include beans, peas, lentils, groundnuts (including peanut butter) and soybeans. When eaten with staple foods the quality of protein is increased. Legumes are a cheaper protein source than animal foods, such as beef and chicken, and should be eaten every day, if possible. Eat animal and milk products regularly Foods from animals and fish should also be eaten as often as you can afford them. They supply good-quality proteins, vitamins and minerals and extra energy. They will help to strengthen muscles and the immune system. These foods include all forms of meat, poultry (birds), fish, eggs and dairy products such as milk, sour milk, buttermilk, yoghurt and cheese. If insects, such as caterpillars or grasshoppers, are part of your diet, they also provide good nutrients. Eat vegetables and fruit every day Vegetables and fruit are an important part of a healthy and balanced meal. They supply the vitamins and minerals that keep the body functioning and the immune system strong. These foods are especially important for people living with HIV/AIDS to fight infection. Eat a wide variety as each one provides different vitamins and minerals.

Chicken Tetrazzini with Butternut Squash

Walang komento :
Simply delicious, make this one-dish chicken leftover meal when there’s no time to cook. ingredients 3 tablespoons butter 2 large shallots, minced (2/3 cup) 1 1/2 cups sliced mushrooms 2 cups chicken broth 1/2 cup half-and-half 2 tablespoons cornstarch 2/3 cup grated Parmesan 3 cups shredded cooked chicken 2 cups diced cooked butternut squash 1/2 pound linguini, cooked very al dente 1 cup panko crumbs or bread crumbs directions Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Coat a 2-quart baking dish with cooking spray. Melt 2 tablespoons butter over medium-high heat in a large saucepan. Add shallots; cook, stirring, 2 minutes. Add mushrooms; cook, stirring, 4 to 5 minutes, or until firm. Add broth; bring to a simmer. Whisk together half-and-half and cornstarch in a bowl. Add half-and-half mixture to broth, whisking, until lightly thickened. Stir in all but 2 tablespoons Parmesan, plus chicken, squash and linguini. Gently toss to combine. Transfer to baking dish. Sprinkle with panko and remaining Parmesan; dot with remaining butter. Bake 25 to 30 minutes, or until bubbling and golden. Non-Restaurant Food-Server Job Duties Food-servers who work in a non-restaurant environment may be employed at such places as hospitals and hotel. They use carts or trays to carry and deliver foods, beverages, condiments and utensils. Duties may also include cleaning dishes and utensils. They must also ensure that the right foods are delivered to the correct recipients and according to any instructions or restrictions. Duties might also include preparing food items, such as appetizers, salads, sandwiches or soups. Responsibilities may also include restocking ice, supplies and condiments. Preparing and delivering customers' bills and accepting customers' payments are also common. Additional Qualifications Food-server job qualifications often include holding a high school diploma, though some institutions do not require this. Employers typically provide on-the-job training. Some employers may prefer prior experience or other training to formal schooling. Food-servers must be able to work in a team. They should possess a professional and neat appearance and be able to communicate effectively with customers. Food-servers are expected to provide courteous service to their customers; they might use verbal and written communication techniques. Efficiency is also necessary. Food-servers also need to possess a good memory, as they need to retain customers' orders along with faces and names. Knowledge of foreign languages is useful. Food-servers also need to have familiarity of food safety, food service regulations, health regulations and proper sanitation practices. They must have an awareness of food-handling rules. Employment Outlook and Salary Information Employment growth of 12% was predicted for food and beverage serving and related workers, from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In 2012, the annual median salary for food preparation and serving related occupations was $18,930, the BLS reported. Food Safety: Serving Topic Overview You can help prevent foodborne illness by taking precautions when serving food. Keep hot foods hot [60°C (140°F) or above] and cold foods cold [4°C (40°F) or below]. Never leave meat, poultry, eggs, fish, or shellfish (raw or cooked) at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the temperature outdoors is above 32°C (90°F), refrigerate within 1 hour. (This is often the case during summer picnics.) Chill leftovers as soon as you finish eating. Store leftovers in small, shallow containers to cool rapidly. Do not reheat food that is contaminated. Reheating does not make it safe. If you are not sure how long a food has been in the refrigerator, throw it out. If you are not sure whether a food is safe, throw it out. When you eat out, be sure that meat is cooked thoroughly and that foods that should be refrigerated, such as puddings and cold cuts, are served cold. Also pay attention to the restaurant environment. If the tables, dinnerware, and washrooms look dirty, the kitchen may be too. It has been firmly established that low maternal intake of folate creates a fetal nutrient deficiency that leads to incomplete development of the fetal nervous system. The critical period for maternal folate intake seems to be the first few weeks of fetal development. Ensuring adequate folate intake during this period is a vexing problem because the fact of pregnancy may not be known even to the mother at this early stage. The confluence of the problem of getting women of childbearing age to eat an adequate amount of folate with the observation that adequate folate helps prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) led to the addition of folic acid to grain foods in the US food supply starting in 1998.1 This strategy has been effective in getting folate to young potential mothers and also in reducing NTDs.2 However, the strategy enhances an otherwise nutrient-poor food (refined grain foods are the primary focus of fortification; whole grain foods are naturally rich in folate) and increases folic acid in purified form to the total population. Eat staple foods with every meal Staple foods should make up the largest part of a meal. These foods are relatively cheap and supply a good amount of energy and some protein. Staples include cereals (such as rice, maize, millet, sorghum, wheat and barley), starchy roots (such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and yams) and starchy fruit (such as plantains). However, staple foods are not enough to provide all the nutrients the body needs. Other foods must be eaten to provide additional energy, proteins and micronutrients. Eat legumes if possible every day These foods provide a person with the proteins needed to develop and repair the body and also to build up strong muscles. They are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fibre and help to keep the immune system active. Legumes include beans, peas, lentils, groundnuts (including peanut butter) and soybeans. When eaten with staple foods the quality of protein is increased. Legumes are a cheaper protein source than animal foods, such as beef and chicken, and should be eaten every day, if possible. Eat animal and milk products regularly Foods from animals and fish should also be eaten as often as you can afford them. They supply good-quality proteins, vitamins and minerals and extra energy. They will help to strengthen muscles and the immune system. These foods include all forms of meat, poultry (birds), fish, eggs and dairy products such as milk, sour milk, buttermilk, yoghurt and cheese. If insects, such as caterpillars or grasshoppers, are part of your diet, they also provide good nutrients. Eat vegetables and fruit every day Vegetables and fruit are an important part of a healthy and balanced meal. They supply the vitamins and minerals that keep the body functioning and the immune system strong. These foods are especially important for people living with HIV/AIDS to fight infection. Eat a wide variety as each one provides different vitamins and minerals.

Turkey and Mushroom Lasagna with White Sauce

Walang komento :
Ground turkey sautéed with meaty shiitake mushrooms nestled between layers of cheesy white sauce is comfort food at its best. If you like a little more spice, use hot or sweet Italian turkey sausage with the casings removed instead of ground turkey. For ease in preparation we used no-boil lasagna noodles, eliminating the need for boiling before assembling. Now that’s using your noodle! ingredients 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided One 10-ounce container cremini mushrooms, sliced 1 onion, finely chopped 1 pound ground turkey 3/4 teaspoon salt 6 tablespoons all-purpose flour 4 cups low-fat milk 12 no-boil lasagna noodles 2 cups shredded Monterey Jack cheese 2 tablespoons whole flat-leaf parsley leaves (optional) directions Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms and onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 8 minutes. Add the turkey and 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook, breaking up the turkey with the back of a spoon, until no longer pink, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat. Let cool slightly. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Spray a 9 x 13-inch baking dish with nonstick spray. To prepare the sauce, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Stir in the flour and cook 1 minute. Gradually whisk in the milk and the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and cook, whisking constantly, until the sauce thickens, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat. To assemble, spread 1/2 cup of the sauce in the baking dish. Arrange one-third of the lasagna noodles over the sauce. Spoon half of the turkey mixture over noodles; top with half of the cheese and one-third of the sauce. Repeat layering once with the lasagna noodles, turkey mixture, cheese and sauce. Top with the remaining lasagna noodles and the remaining sauce. Place the parsley leaves, if using, randomly on top of the sauce. Bake, loosely covered with a tent of foil, 35 minutes. Uncover and continue to bake until the mixture is bubbly around the edges and the topping is lightly browned, about 15 minutes longer. Let stand 10 minutes before slicing. Non-Restaurant Food-Server Job Duties Food-servers who work in a non-restaurant environment may be employed at such places as hospitals and hotel. They use carts or trays to carry and deliver foods, beverages, condiments and utensils. Duties may also include cleaning dishes and utensils. They must also ensure that the right foods are delivered to the correct recipients and according to any instructions or restrictions. Duties might also include preparing food items, such as appetizers, salads, sandwiches or soups. Responsibilities may also include restocking ice, supplies and condiments. Preparing and delivering customers' bills and accepting customers' payments are also common. Additional Qualifications Food-server job qualifications often include holding a high school diploma, though some institutions do not require this. Employers typically provide on-the-job training. Some employers may prefer prior experience or other training to formal schooling. Food-servers must be able to work in a team. They should possess a professional and neat appearance and be able to communicate effectively with customers. Food-servers are expected to provide courteous service to their customers; they might use verbal and written communication techniques. Efficiency is also necessary. Food-servers also need to possess a good memory, as they need to retain customers' orders along with faces and names. Knowledge of foreign languages is useful. Food-servers also need to have familiarity of food safety, food service regulations, health regulations and proper sanitation practices. They must have an awareness of food-handling rules. Employment Outlook and Salary Information Employment growth of 12% was predicted for food and beverage serving and related workers, from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In 2012, the annual median salary for food preparation and serving related occupations was $18,930, the BLS reported. Food Safety: Serving Topic Overview You can help prevent foodborne illness by taking precautions when serving food. Keep hot foods hot [60°C (140°F) or above] and cold foods cold [4°C (40°F) or below]. Never leave meat, poultry, eggs, fish, or shellfish (raw or cooked) at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the temperature outdoors is above 32°C (90°F), refrigerate within 1 hour. (This is often the case during summer picnics.) Chill leftovers as soon as you finish eating. Store leftovers in small, shallow containers to cool rapidly. Do not reheat food that is contaminated. Reheating does not make it safe. If you are not sure how long a food has been in the refrigerator, throw it out. If you are not sure whether a food is safe, throw it out. When you eat out, be sure that meat is cooked thoroughly and that foods that should be refrigerated, such as puddings and cold cuts, are served cold. Also pay attention to the restaurant environment. If the tables, dinnerware, and washrooms look dirty, the kitchen may be too. It has been firmly established that low maternal intake of folate creates a fetal nutrient deficiency that leads to incomplete development of the fetal nervous system. The critical period for maternal folate intake seems to be the first few weeks of fetal development. Ensuring adequate folate intake during this period is a vexing problem because the fact of pregnancy may not be known even to the mother at this early stage. The confluence of the problem of getting women of childbearing age to eat an adequate amount of folate with the observation that adequate folate helps prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) led to the addition of folic acid to grain foods in the US food supply starting in 1998.1 This strategy has been effective in getting folate to young potential mothers and also in reducing NTDs.2 However, the strategy enhances an otherwise nutrient-poor food (refined grain foods are the primary focus of fortification; whole grain foods are naturally rich in folate) and increases folic acid in purified form to the total population. Eat staple foods with every meal Staple foods should make up the largest part of a meal. These foods are relatively cheap and supply a good amount of energy and some protein. Staples include cereals (such as rice, maize, millet, sorghum, wheat and barley), starchy roots (such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and yams) and starchy fruit (such as plantains). However, staple foods are not enough to provide all the nutrients the body needs. Other foods must be eaten to provide additional energy, proteins and micronutrients. Eat legumes if possible every day These foods provide a person with the proteins needed to develop and repair the body and also to build up strong muscles. They are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fibre and help to keep the immune system active. Legumes include beans, peas, lentils, groundnuts (including peanut butter) and soybeans. When eaten with staple foods the quality of protein is increased. Legumes are a cheaper protein source than animal foods, such as beef and chicken, and should be eaten every day, if possible. Eat animal and milk products regularly Foods from animals and fish should also be eaten as often as you can afford them. They supply good-quality proteins, vitamins and minerals and extra energy. They will help to strengthen muscles and the immune system. These foods include all forms of meat, poultry (birds), fish, eggs and dairy products such as milk, sour milk, buttermilk, yoghurt and cheese. If insects, such as caterpillars or grasshoppers, are part of your diet, they also provide good nutrients. Eat vegetables and fruit every day Vegetables and fruit are an important part of a healthy and balanced meal. They supply the vitamins and minerals that keep the body functioning and the immune system strong. These foods are especially important for people living with HIV/AIDS to fight infection. Eat a wide variety as each one provides different vitamins and minerals.

Quick Chicken Cassoulet

Walang komento :
Aside from a quick broil at the end, this modified cassoulet can be done entirely on the stovetop in a large skillet. Darker meat chicken thighs are recommended as they add a richer flavor to the dish than breast meat would, and smoky turkey kielbasa and a bit of bacon stand in nicely for the traditional pork sausages and ham hocks. ingredients 2 thick-cut slices of smoked bacon, roughly chopped 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs (about 5), trimmed of fat and cut into 2-inch chunks 1 teaspoon olive oil 1 large Vidalia onion, chopped 1 carrot, chopped 1 celery stick, chopped 4 garlic cloves, chopped 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 cup dry white wine 1/2 cup low-sodium chicken broth One 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes Two 15-ounce cans Great Northern white beans 2 bay leaves 12 ounces turkey kielbasa, sliced on the bias into 1/2-inch pieces 1/2 cup fresh breadcrumbs 1/4 cup grated Parmesan 2 tablespoons chopped parsley directions In a Dutch oven or large straight-sided skillet, heat the oil over medium heat and cook the bacon until crispy, then set aside, leaving the drippings in the pan. Add the chicken and cook until browned on both sides, about 6 minutes total. Set the chicken aside with the bacon. In the same pot, turn the heat to medium-high and heat the teaspoon of olive oil. Add the onion, carrot, celery, garlic, thyme and cayenne pepper. Saute until the onions are golden, about 8 minutes. Add the wine and bay leaves to the pan and deglaze, scraping up any browned bits. Bring to a simmer and let the wine reduce by half, about 2 to 3 minutes. Add the broth, diced tomatoes, beans and kielbasa. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer. Let the mixture reduce for about 10 minutes until slightly thickened. Preheat the broiler. Return the chicken and bacon to the pan and simmer until the chicken is cooked through, about 5 minutes. Remove the bay leaves. Sprinkle the breadcrumbs and Parmesan on top and place under the broiler until lightly browned. Sprinkle with parsley and serve. Non-Restaurant Food-Server Job Duties Food-servers who work in a non-restaurant environment may be employed at such places as hospitals and hotel. They use carts or trays to carry and deliver foods, beverages, condiments and utensils. Duties may also include cleaning dishes and utensils. They must also ensure that the right foods are delivered to the correct recipients and according to any instructions or restrictions. Duties might also include preparing food items, such as appetizers, salads, sandwiches or soups. Responsibilities may also include restocking ice, supplies and condiments. Preparing and delivering customers' bills and accepting customers' payments are also common. Additional Qualifications Food-server job qualifications often include holding a high school diploma, though some institutions do not require this. Employers typically provide on-the-job training. Some employers may prefer prior experience or other training to formal schooling. Food-servers must be able to work in a team. They should possess a professional and neat appearance and be able to communicate effectively with customers. Food-servers are expected to provide courteous service to their customers; they might use verbal and written communication techniques. Efficiency is also necessary. Food-servers also need to possess a good memory, as they need to retain customers' orders along with faces and names. Knowledge of foreign languages is useful. Food-servers also need to have familiarity of food safety, food service regulations, health regulations and proper sanitation practices. They must have an awareness of food-handling rules. Employment Outlook and Salary Information Employment growth of 12% was predicted for food and beverage serving and related workers, from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In 2012, the annual median salary for food preparation and serving related occupations was $18,930, the BLS reported. Food Safety: Serving Topic Overview You can help prevent foodborne illness by taking precautions when serving food. Keep hot foods hot [60°C (140°F) or above] and cold foods cold [4°C (40°F) or below]. Never leave meat, poultry, eggs, fish, or shellfish (raw or cooked) at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the temperature outdoors is above 32°C (90°F), refrigerate within 1 hour. (This is often the case during summer picnics.) Chill leftovers as soon as you finish eating. Store leftovers in small, shallow containers to cool rapidly. Do not reheat food that is contaminated. Reheating does not make it safe. If you are not sure how long a food has been in the refrigerator, throw it out. If you are not sure whether a food is safe, throw it out. When you eat out, be sure that meat is cooked thoroughly and that foods that should be refrigerated, such as puddings and cold cuts, are served cold. Also pay attention to the restaurant environment. If the tables, dinnerware, and washrooms look dirty, the kitchen may be too. It has been firmly established that low maternal intake of folate creates a fetal nutrient deficiency that leads to incomplete development of the fetal nervous system. The critical period for maternal folate intake seems to be the first few weeks of fetal development. Ensuring adequate folate intake during this period is a vexing problem because the fact of pregnancy may not be known even to the mother at this early stage. The confluence of the problem of getting women of childbearing age to eat an adequate amount of folate with the observation that adequate folate helps prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) led to the addition of folic acid to grain foods in the US food supply starting in 1998.1 This strategy has been effective in getting folate to young potential mothers and also in reducing NTDs.2 However, the strategy enhances an otherwise nutrient-poor food (refined grain foods are the primary focus of fortification; whole grain foods are naturally rich in folate) and increases folic acid in purified form to the total population. Eat staple foods with every meal Staple foods should make up the largest part of a meal. These foods are relatively cheap and supply a good amount of energy and some protein. Staples include cereals (such as rice, maize, millet, sorghum, wheat and barley), starchy roots (such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and yams) and starchy fruit (such as plantains). However, staple foods are not enough to provide all the nutrients the body needs. Other foods must be eaten to provide additional energy, proteins and micronutrients. Eat legumes if possible every day These foods provide a person with the proteins needed to develop and repair the body and also to build up strong muscles. They are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fibre and help to keep the immune system active. Legumes include beans, peas, lentils, groundnuts (including peanut butter) and soybeans. When eaten with staple foods the quality of protein is increased. Legumes are a cheaper protein source than animal foods, such as beef and chicken, and should be eaten every day, if possible. Eat animal and milk products regularly Foods from animals and fish should also be eaten as often as you can afford them. They supply good-quality proteins, vitamins and minerals and extra energy. They will help to strengthen muscles and the immune system. These foods include all forms of meat, poultry (birds), fish, eggs and dairy products such as milk, sour milk, buttermilk, yoghurt and cheese. If insects, such as caterpillars or grasshoppers, are part of your diet, they also provide good nutrients. Eat vegetables and fruit every day Vegetables and fruit are an important part of a healthy and balanced meal. They supply the vitamins and minerals that keep the body functioning and the immune system strong. These foods are especially important for people living with HIV/AIDS to fight infection. Eat a wide variety as each one provides different vitamins and minerals.

Chicken Piccata Pasta Toss

Walang komento :
A rich lemon-caper sauce made with extra-virgin olive oil and butter flavors this chicken piccata with pasta. ingredients 8 ounces pasta (elbow, bowties or penne) 2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves, butterflied, lightly pounded and halved Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste 1 tablespoon flour plus more for dredging, divided 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons olive oil, divided 2 tablespoons butter, divided 1/3 cup dry white wine 3 tablespoons lemon juice 1 small onion, diced 1 clove garlic, minced 1 1/2 cups chicken stock 3 tablespoons of capers, rinsed 4 tablespoons chopped parsley, divided 4 lemon wedges, for serving directions Preheat the oven to 200 degrees F. Bring a pot of water to a boil. Cook the penne according to package directions until al dente. Drain and set aside. Season the chicken with salt and pepper, then dredge the chicken in flour, shaking off any excess. In a nonstick skillet over medium to medium-high heat, heat 1 tablespoon of oil and 1 tablespoon butter. Sauté the chicken until browned on both sides and cooked through, about 3 or 4 minutes per side. Set aside in the warm oven. Add 2 teaspoons of oil to the pan and sauté the onion and garlic until the onion is lightly browned, about 3 minutes. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon flour over the onions and sauté, stirring, for 1 minute. Add the wine to the pan to deglaze, about 1 minute. Whisk in the lemon juice and chicken stock and bring to a simmer. Cook until slightly thickened, about 4 to 5 minutes. Stir in the remaining tablespoon of butter, capers and 2 tablespoons of parsley. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Toss the cooked pasta into the sauce. Plate the pasta then place a piece of chicken over each portion. Sprinkle with remaining parsley and serve with lemon wedges. Non-Restaurant Food-Server Job Duties Food-servers who work in a non-restaurant environment may be employed at such places as hospitals and hotel. They use carts or trays to carry and deliver foods, beverages, condiments and utensils. Duties may also include cleaning dishes and utensils. They must also ensure that the right foods are delivered to the correct recipients and according to any instructions or restrictions. Duties might also include preparing food items, such as appetizers, salads, sandwiches or soups. Responsibilities may also include restocking ice, supplies and condiments. Preparing and delivering customers' bills and accepting customers' payments are also common. Additional Qualifications Food-server job qualifications often include holding a high school diploma, though some institutions do not require this. Employers typically provide on-the-job training. Some employers may prefer prior experience or other training to formal schooling. Food-servers must be able to work in a team. They should possess a professional and neat appearance and be able to communicate effectively with customers. Food-servers are expected to provide courteous service to their customers; they might use verbal and written communication techniques. Efficiency is also necessary. Food-servers also need to possess a good memory, as they need to retain customers' orders along with faces and names. Knowledge of foreign languages is useful. Food-servers also need to have familiarity of food safety, food service regulations, health regulations and proper sanitation practices. They must have an awareness of food-handling rules. Employment Outlook and Salary Information Employment growth of 12% was predicted for food and beverage serving and related workers, from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In 2012, the annual median salary for food preparation and serving related occupations was $18,930, the BLS reported. Food Safety: Serving Topic Overview You can help prevent foodborne illness by taking precautions when serving food. Keep hot foods hot [60°C (140°F) or above] and cold foods cold [4°C (40°F) or below]. Never leave meat, poultry, eggs, fish, or shellfish (raw or cooked) at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the temperature outdoors is above 32°C (90°F), refrigerate within 1 hour. (This is often the case during summer picnics.) Chill leftovers as soon as you finish eating. Store leftovers in small, shallow containers to cool rapidly. Do not reheat food that is contaminated. Reheating does not make it safe. If you are not sure how long a food has been in the refrigerator, throw it out. If you are not sure whether a food is safe, throw it out. When you eat out, be sure that meat is cooked thoroughly and that foods that should be refrigerated, such as puddings and cold cuts, are served cold. Also pay attention to the restaurant environment. If the tables, dinnerware, and washrooms look dirty, the kitchen may be too. It has been firmly established that low maternal intake of folate creates a fetal nutrient deficiency that leads to incomplete development of the fetal nervous system. The critical period for maternal folate intake seems to be the first few weeks of fetal development. Ensuring adequate folate intake during this period is a vexing problem because the fact of pregnancy may not be known even to the mother at this early stage. The confluence of the problem of getting women of childbearing age to eat an adequate amount of folate with the observation that adequate folate helps prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) led to the addition of folic acid to grain foods in the US food supply starting in 1998.1 This strategy has been effective in getting folate to young potential mothers and also in reducing NTDs.2 However, the strategy enhances an otherwise nutrient-poor food (refined grain foods are the primary focus of fortification; whole grain foods are naturally rich in folate) and increases folic acid in purified form to the total population. Eat staple foods with every meal Staple foods should make up the largest part of a meal. These foods are relatively cheap and supply a good amount of energy and some protein. Staples include cereals (such as rice, maize, millet, sorghum, wheat and barley), starchy roots (such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and yams) and starchy fruit (such as plantains). However, staple foods are not enough to provide all the nutrients the body needs. Other foods must be eaten to provide additional energy, proteins and micronutrients. Eat legumes if possible every day These foods provide a person with the proteins needed to develop and repair the body and also to build up strong muscles. They are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fibre and help to keep the immune system active. Legumes include beans, peas, lentils, groundnuts (including peanut butter) and soybeans. When eaten with staple foods the quality of protein is increased. Legumes are a cheaper protein source than animal foods, such as beef and chicken, and should be eaten every day, if possible. Eat animal and milk products regularly Foods from animals and fish should also be eaten as often as you can afford them. They supply good-quality proteins, vitamins and minerals and extra energy. They will help to strengthen muscles and the immune system. These foods include all forms of meat, poultry (birds), fish, eggs and dairy products such as milk, sour milk, buttermilk, yoghurt and cheese. If insects, such as caterpillars or grasshoppers, are part of your diet, they also provide good nutrients. Eat vegetables and fruit every day Vegetables and fruit are an important part of a healthy and balanced meal. They supply the vitamins and minerals that keep the body functioning and the immune system strong. These foods are especially important for people living with HIV/AIDS to fight infection. Eat a wide variety as each one provides different vitamins and minerals.

Layered Chicken, Polenta and Eggplant Casserole

Walang komento :
Assemble this casserole ahead of time and simply pop in the oven when ready to serve. ingredients 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 1/2 cup diced bell pepper 1 cup minced onion 3 cups diced eggplant 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper One 2-pound log prepared polenta, cut into slices 1/3-inch thick 3 cups shredded, precooked chicken One 24-ounce jar marinara sauce 1 1/2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese Cooking spray directions Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Coat a 8 x 10-inch baking pan with cooking spray. Heat oil over medium-high heat until hot in a large skillet. Add bell pepper and onion; cook, stirring, 5 minutes. Add eggplant; cook, stirring, 5 minutes more, or until lightly colored. Season vegetables with salt and pepper. Layer half the polenta slices on bottom of baking pan. Cover with half the chicken and half the vegetables. Spoon half the marinara sauce over the chicken and sprinkle with half the mozzarella. Layer remaining ingredients in the same manner ending with mozzarella. Bake 25 to 30 minutes, or until bubbling. Let stand 5 minutes before serving. Non-Restaurant Food-Server Job Duties Food-servers who work in a non-restaurant environment may be employed at such places as hospitals and hotel. They use carts or trays to carry and deliver foods, beverages, condiments and utensils. Duties may also include cleaning dishes and utensils. They must also ensure that the right foods are delivered to the correct recipients and according to any instructions or restrictions. Duties might also include preparing food items, such as appetizers, salads, sandwiches or soups. Responsibilities may also include restocking ice, supplies and condiments. Preparing and delivering customers' bills and accepting customers' payments are also common. Additional Qualifications Food-server job qualifications often include holding a high school diploma, though some institutions do not require this. Employers typically provide on-the-job training. Some employers may prefer prior experience or other training to formal schooling. Food-servers must be able to work in a team. They should possess a professional and neat appearance and be able to communicate effectively with customers. Food-servers are expected to provide courteous service to their customers; they might use verbal and written communication techniques. Efficiency is also necessary. Food-servers also need to possess a good memory, as they need to retain customers' orders along with faces and names. Knowledge of foreign languages is useful. Food-servers also need to have familiarity of food safety, food service regulations, health regulations and proper sanitation practices. They must have an awareness of food-handling rules. Employment Outlook and Salary Information Employment growth of 12% was predicted for food and beverage serving and related workers, from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In 2012, the annual median salary for food preparation and serving related occupations was $18,930, the BLS reported. Food Safety: Serving Topic Overview You can help prevent foodborne illness by taking precautions when serving food. Keep hot foods hot [60°C (140°F) or above] and cold foods cold [4°C (40°F) or below]. Never leave meat, poultry, eggs, fish, or shellfish (raw or cooked) at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the temperature outdoors is above 32°C (90°F), refrigerate within 1 hour. (This is often the case during summer picnics.) Chill leftovers as soon as you finish eating. Store leftovers in small, shallow containers to cool rapidly. Do not reheat food that is contaminated. Reheating does not make it safe. If you are not sure how long a food has been in the refrigerator, throw it out. If you are not sure whether a food is safe, throw it out. When you eat out, be sure that meat is cooked thoroughly and that foods that should be refrigerated, such as puddings and cold cuts, are served cold. Also pay attention to the restaurant environment. If the tables, dinnerware, and washrooms look dirty, the kitchen may be too. It has been firmly established that low maternal intake of folate creates a fetal nutrient deficiency that leads to incomplete development of the fetal nervous system. The critical period for maternal folate intake seems to be the first few weeks of fetal development. Ensuring adequate folate intake during this period is a vexing problem because the fact of pregnancy may not be known even to the mother at this early stage. The confluence of the problem of getting women of childbearing age to eat an adequate amount of folate with the observation that adequate folate helps prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) led to the addition of folic acid to grain foods in the US food supply starting in 1998.1 This strategy has been effective in getting folate to young potential mothers and also in reducing NTDs.2 However, the strategy enhances an otherwise nutrient-poor food (refined grain foods are the primary focus of fortification; whole grain foods are naturally rich in folate) and increases folic acid in purified form to the total population. Eat staple foods with every meal Staple foods should make up the largest part of a meal. These foods are relatively cheap and supply a good amount of energy and some protein. Staples include cereals (such as rice, maize, millet, sorghum, wheat and barley), starchy roots (such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and yams) and starchy fruit (such as plantains). However, staple foods are not enough to provide all the nutrients the body needs. Other foods must be eaten to provide additional energy, proteins and micronutrients. Eat legumes if possible every day These foods provide a person with the proteins needed to develop and repair the body and also to build up strong muscles. They are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fibre and help to keep the immune system active. Legumes include beans, peas, lentils, groundnuts (including peanut butter) and soybeans. When eaten with staple foods the quality of protein is increased. Legumes are a cheaper protein source than animal foods, such as beef and chicken, and should be eaten every day, if possible. Eat animal and milk products regularly Foods from animals and fish should also be eaten as often as you can afford them. They supply good-quality proteins, vitamins and minerals and extra energy. They will help to strengthen muscles and the immune system. These foods include all forms of meat, poultry (birds), fish, eggs and dairy products such as milk, sour milk, buttermilk, yoghurt and cheese. If insects, such as caterpillars or grasshoppers, are part of your diet, they also provide good nutrients. Eat vegetables and fruit every day Vegetables and fruit are an important part of a healthy and balanced meal. They supply the vitamins and minerals that keep the body functioning and the immune system strong. These foods are especially important for people living with HIV/AIDS to fight infection. Eat a wide variety as each one provides different vitamins and minerals.

Scallion and Bacon Potato Pancake

Walang komento :
This savory pancake is so simple and easy to make. It’s a perfect side dish for your holiday breakfast or brunch. Cut it into wedges and serve piping hot with eggs and all the fixings. We made one large skillet pancake, but you can make individual pancakes too. Serve them with cranberry applesauce or sour cream. ingredients One 20-ounce package refrigerated shredded hash brown potatoes 6 slices ready-cooked bacon, coarsely chopped 6 scallions, thinly sliced 1 egg white 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon salt 4 tablespoons olive oil directions Stir together the potatoes, bacon, scallions, egg white, paprika and salt in a large bowl until well mixed. Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add the potato mixture, spreading and pressing it down to form an even layer. Cook, shaking the pan occasionally, to prevent the potatoes from sticking, until the potatoes are browned on the bottom, 8 to 10 minutes. Invert a large plate on top of the potatoes and carefully turn the skillet over. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons oil to the skillet. Slide the hash browns back into the skillet and cook until the bottom is golden brown, about 10 minutes longer. Slide onto a plate. Cut into 6 wedges. Non-Restaurant Food-Server Job Duties Food-servers who work in a non-restaurant environment may be employed at such places as hospitals and hotel. They use carts or trays to carry and deliver foods, beverages, condiments and utensils. Duties may also include cleaning dishes and utensils. They must also ensure that the right foods are delivered to the correct recipients and according to any instructions or restrictions. Duties might also include preparing food items, such as appetizers, salads, sandwiches or soups. Responsibilities may also include restocking ice, supplies and condiments. Preparing and delivering customers' bills and accepting customers' payments are also common. Additional Qualifications Food-server job qualifications often include holding a high school diploma, though some institutions do not require this. Employers typically provide on-the-job training. Some employers may prefer prior experience or other training to formal schooling. Food-servers must be able to work in a team. They should possess a professional and neat appearance and be able to communicate effectively with customers. Food-servers are expected to provide courteous service to their customers; they might use verbal and written communication techniques. Efficiency is also necessary. Food-servers also need to possess a good memory, as they need to retain customers' orders along with faces and names. Knowledge of foreign languages is useful. Food-servers also need to have familiarity of food safety, food service regulations, health regulations and proper sanitation practices. They must have an awareness of food-handling rules. Employment Outlook and Salary Information Employment growth of 12% was predicted for food and beverage serving and related workers, from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In 2012, the annual median salary for food preparation and serving related occupations was $18,930, the BLS reported. Food Safety: Serving Topic Overview You can help prevent foodborne illness by taking precautions when serving food. Keep hot foods hot [60°C (140°F) or above] and cold foods cold [4°C (40°F) or below]. Never leave meat, poultry, eggs, fish, or shellfish (raw or cooked) at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the temperature outdoors is above 32°C (90°F), refrigerate within 1 hour. (This is often the case during summer picnics.) Chill leftovers as soon as you finish eating. Store leftovers in small, shallow containers to cool rapidly. Do not reheat food that is contaminated. Reheating does not make it safe. If you are not sure how long a food has been in the refrigerator, throw it out. If you are not sure whether a food is safe, throw it out. When you eat out, be sure that meat is cooked thoroughly and that foods that should be refrigerated, such as puddings and cold cuts, are served cold. Also pay attention to the restaurant environment. If the tables, dinnerware, and washrooms look dirty, the kitchen may be too. It has been firmly established that low maternal intake of folate creates a fetal nutrient deficiency that leads to incomplete development of the fetal nervous system. The critical period for maternal folate intake seems to be the first few weeks of fetal development. Ensuring adequate folate intake during this period is a vexing problem because the fact of pregnancy may not be known even to the mother at this early stage. The confluence of the problem of getting women of childbearing age to eat an adequate amount of folate with the observation that adequate folate helps prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) led to the addition of folic acid to grain foods in the US food supply starting in 1998.1 This strategy has been effective in getting folate to young potential mothers and also in reducing NTDs.2 However, the strategy enhances an otherwise nutrient-poor food (refined grain foods are the primary focus of fortification; whole grain foods are naturally rich in folate) and increases folic acid in purified form to the total population. Eat staple foods with every meal Staple foods should make up the largest part of a meal. These foods are relatively cheap and supply a good amount of energy and some protein. Staples include cereals (such as rice, maize, millet, sorghum, wheat and barley), starchy roots (such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and yams) and starchy fruit (such as plantains). However, staple foods are not enough to provide all the nutrients the body needs. Other foods must be eaten to provide additional energy, proteins and micronutrients. Eat legumes if possible every day These foods provide a person with the proteins needed to develop and repair the body and also to build up strong muscles. They are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fibre and help to keep the immune system active. Legumes include beans, peas, lentils, groundnuts (including peanut butter) and soybeans. When eaten with staple foods the quality of protein is increased. Legumes are a cheaper protein source than animal foods, such as beef and chicken, and should be eaten every day, if possible. Eat animal and milk products regularly Foods from animals and fish should also be eaten as often as you can afford them. They supply good-quality proteins, vitamins and minerals and extra energy. They will help to strengthen muscles and the immune system. These foods include all forms of meat, poultry (birds), fish, eggs and dairy products such as milk, sour milk, buttermilk, yoghurt and cheese. If insects, such as caterpillars or grasshoppers, are part of your diet, they also provide good nutrients. Eat vegetables and fruit every day Vegetables and fruit are an important part of a healthy and balanced meal. They supply the vitamins and minerals that keep the body functioning and the immune system strong. These foods are especially important for people living with HIV/AIDS to fight infection. Eat a wide variety as each one provides different vitamins and minerals.

Lightened-Up Three-Cheese Mac and Cheese

Walang komento :
Using nutritious whole-wheat pasta and pureed vegetables, this dish cuts the fat and calories of traditional mac and cheese without sacrificing flavor. Top with homemade breadcrumbs and Parmesan cheese for a tasty crunch. ingredients 8 ounces dry whole-wheat pasta elbows 1 slice whole-wheat sandwich bread 2 small yellow onions, roughly chopped 8 cloves garlic, peeled 1/2 cup reduced fat 2% milk 1 1/2 ounces reduced fat cream cheese 1/4 teaspoon Kosher salt 1/4 teaspoon dry mustard 1 cup (about 4 ounces) grated sharp cheddar cheese 1/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese directions Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Grease the insides of four 6-ounce ramekins. (You can also use an 8 x 8-inch casserole pan.) Cook the pasta according to manufacturers’ directions. Drain, and set aside. Rip up the bread into small pieces and place in the bowl of a food processor. Process the bread into crumbs. Transfer the crumbs to a baking sheet and toast in the oven until dry and crisp. In a medium saucepan, add the chopped onion and garlic. Add enough water to cover. Cover the pan with a lid and bring to a boil over high heat. Turn the heat down and simmer the vegetables until tender. Drain. Transfer the vegetables to a blender or food processor. Add the milk, then process until the puree is smooth and velvety. Pour the puree back to the same saucepan over low heat. Whisk in the cream cheese, salt and mustard. When the mixture is smooth, turn the heat off and whisk in the cheddar cheese. Stir in the pasta. (The sauce will seem thin, but the pasta will eventually absorb the liquid.) When the pasta is coated, equally divide the mixture into the prepared ramekins. Top with the breadcrumbs and Parmesan cheese. Place the ramekins on a baking sheet and bake in the oven until the cheese is melted, about 5 minutes. Serve immediately. Non-Restaurant Food-Server Job Duties Food-servers who work in a non-restaurant environment may be employed at such places as hospitals and hotel. They use carts or trays to carry and deliver foods, beverages, condiments and utensils. Duties may also include cleaning dishes and utensils. They must also ensure that the right foods are delivered to the correct recipients and according to any instructions or restrictions. Duties might also include preparing food items, such as appetizers, salads, sandwiches or soups. Responsibilities may also include restocking ice, supplies and condiments. Preparing and delivering customers' bills and accepting customers' payments are also common. Additional Qualifications Food-server job qualifications often include holding a high school diploma, though some institutions do not require this. Employers typically provide on-the-job training. Some employers may prefer prior experience or other training to formal schooling. Food-servers must be able to work in a team. They should possess a professional and neat appearance and be able to communicate effectively with customers. Food-servers are expected to provide courteous service to their customers; they might use verbal and written communication techniques. Efficiency is also necessary. Food-servers also need to possess a good memory, as they need to retain customers' orders along with faces and names. Knowledge of foreign languages is useful. Food-servers also need to have familiarity of food safety, food service regulations, health regulations and proper sanitation practices. They must have an awareness of food-handling rules. Employment Outlook and Salary Information Employment growth of 12% was predicted for food and beverage serving and related workers, from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In 2012, the annual median salary for food preparation and serving related occupations was $18,930, the BLS reported. Food Safety: Serving Topic Overview You can help prevent foodborne illness by taking precautions when serving food. Keep hot foods hot [60°C (140°F) or above] and cold foods cold [4°C (40°F) or below]. Never leave meat, poultry, eggs, fish, or shellfish (raw or cooked) at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the temperature outdoors is above 32°C (90°F), refrigerate within 1 hour. (This is often the case during summer picnics.) Chill leftovers as soon as you finish eating. Store leftovers in small, shallow containers to cool rapidly. Do not reheat food that is contaminated. Reheating does not make it safe. If you are not sure how long a food has been in the refrigerator, throw it out. If you are not sure whether a food is safe, throw it out. When you eat out, be sure that meat is cooked thoroughly and that foods that should be refrigerated, such as puddings and cold cuts, are served cold. Also pay attention to the restaurant environment. If the tables, dinnerware, and washrooms look dirty, the kitchen may be too. It has been firmly established that low maternal intake of folate creates a fetal nutrient deficiency that leads to incomplete development of the fetal nervous system. The critical period for maternal folate intake seems to be the first few weeks of fetal development. Ensuring adequate folate intake during this period is a vexing problem because the fact of pregnancy may not be known even to the mother at this early stage. The confluence of the problem of getting women of childbearing age to eat an adequate amount of folate with the observation that adequate folate helps prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) led to the addition of folic acid to grain foods in the US food supply starting in 1998.1 This strategy has been effective in getting folate to young potential mothers and also in reducing NTDs.2 However, the strategy enhances an otherwise nutrient-poor food (refined grain foods are the primary focus of fortification; whole grain foods are naturally rich in folate) and increases folic acid in purified form to the total population. Eat staple foods with every meal Staple foods should make up the largest part of a meal. These foods are relatively cheap and supply a good amount of energy and some protein. Staples include cereals (such as rice, maize, millet, sorghum, wheat and barley), starchy roots (such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and yams) and starchy fruit (such as plantains). However, staple foods are not enough to provide all the nutrients the body needs. Other foods must be eaten to provide additional energy, proteins and micronutrients. Eat legumes if possible every day These foods provide a person with the proteins needed to develop and repair the body and also to build up strong muscles. They are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fibre and help to keep the immune system active. Legumes include beans, peas, lentils, groundnuts (including peanut butter) and soybeans. When eaten with staple foods the quality of protein is increased. Legumes are a cheaper protein source than animal foods, such as beef and chicken, and should be eaten every day, if possible. Eat animal and milk products regularly Foods from animals and fish should also be eaten as often as you can afford them. They supply good-quality proteins, vitamins and minerals and extra energy. They will help to strengthen muscles and the immune system. These foods include all forms of meat, poultry (birds), fish, eggs and dairy products such as milk, sour milk, buttermilk, yoghurt and cheese. If insects, such as caterpillars or grasshoppers, are part of your diet, they also provide good nutrients. Eat vegetables and fruit every day Vegetables and fruit are an important part of a healthy and balanced meal. They supply the vitamins and minerals that keep the body functioning and the immune system strong. These foods are especially important for people living with HIV/AIDS to fight infection. Eat a wide variety as each one provides different vitamins and minerals.

Chicken Noodle Casserole

Walang komento :
ingredients 1 can (10 3/4 ounces) condensed cream of chicken soup, undiluted 1/2 cup mayonnaise 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 cups cubed cooked chicken 1 small onion, chopped 1/4 cup chopped green pepper 1/4 cup chopped sweet red pepper 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded Monterey Jack cheese, divided 1 cup (4 ounces) shredded sharp cheddar cheese, divided 12 ounces medium egg noodles, cooked and drained directions In a large bowl, combine soup, mayonnaise and lemon juice. Add the chicken, onion, peppers, 1/2 cup of Monterey Jack cheese and 1/2 cup of cheddar cheese; mix well. Add noodles and toss to coat. Transfer to a greased 2-quart baking dish. Bake, uncovered, at 350 degrees F for 30 to 35 minutes. Sprinkle with remaining cheeses. Bake 10 minutes longer or until vegetables are tender and cheese is melted. Non-Restaurant Food-Server Job Duties Food-servers who work in a non-restaurant environment may be employed at such places as hospitals and hotel. They use carts or trays to carry and deliver foods, beverages, condiments and utensils. Duties may also include cleaning dishes and utensils. They must also ensure that the right foods are delivered to the correct recipients and according to any instructions or restrictions. Duties might also include preparing food items, such as appetizers, salads, sandwiches or soups. Responsibilities may also include restocking ice, supplies and condiments. Preparing and delivering customers' bills and accepting customers' payments are also common. Additional Qualifications Food-server job qualifications often include holding a high school diploma, though some institutions do not require this. Employers typically provide on-the-job training. Some employers may prefer prior experience or other training to formal schooling. Food-servers must be able to work in a team. They should possess a professional and neat appearance and be able to communicate effectively with customers. Food-servers are expected to provide courteous service to their customers; they might use verbal and written communication techniques. Efficiency is also necessary. Food-servers also need to possess a good memory, as they need to retain customers' orders along with faces and names. Knowledge of foreign languages is useful. Food-servers also need to have familiarity of food safety, food service regulations, health regulations and proper sanitation practices. They must have an awareness of food-handling rules. Employment Outlook and Salary Information Employment growth of 12% was predicted for food and beverage serving and related workers, from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In 2012, the annual median salary for food preparation and serving related occupations was $18,930, the BLS reported. Food Safety: Serving Topic Overview You can help prevent foodborne illness by taking precautions when serving food. Keep hot foods hot [60°C (140°F) or above] and cold foods cold [4°C (40°F) or below]. Never leave meat, poultry, eggs, fish, or shellfish (raw or cooked) at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the temperature outdoors is above 32°C (90°F), refrigerate within 1 hour. (This is often the case during summer picnics.) Chill leftovers as soon as you finish eating. Store leftovers in small, shallow containers to cool rapidly. Do not reheat food that is contaminated. Reheating does not make it safe. If you are not sure how long a food has been in the refrigerator, throw it out. If you are not sure whether a food is safe, throw it out. When you eat out, be sure that meat is cooked thoroughly and that foods that should be refrigerated, such as puddings and cold cuts, are served cold. Also pay attention to the restaurant environment. If the tables, dinnerware, and washrooms look dirty, the kitchen may be too. It has been firmly established that low maternal intake of folate creates a fetal nutrient deficiency that leads to incomplete development of the fetal nervous system. The critical period for maternal folate intake seems to be the first few weeks of fetal development. Ensuring adequate folate intake during this period is a vexing problem because the fact of pregnancy may not be known even to the mother at this early stage. The confluence of the problem of getting women of childbearing age to eat an adequate amount of folate with the observation that adequate folate helps prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) led to the addition of folic acid to grain foods in the US food supply starting in 1998.1 This strategy has been effective in getting folate to young potential mothers and also in reducing NTDs.2 However, the strategy enhances an otherwise nutrient-poor food (refined grain foods are the primary focus of fortification; whole grain foods are naturally rich in folate) and increases folic acid in purified form to the total population. Eat staple foods with every meal Staple foods should make up the largest part of a meal. These foods are relatively cheap and supply a good amount of energy and some protein. Staples include cereals (such as rice, maize, millet, sorghum, wheat and barley), starchy roots (such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and yams) and starchy fruit (such as plantains). However, staple foods are not enough to provide all the nutrients the body needs. Other foods must be eaten to provide additional energy, proteins and micronutrients. Eat legumes if possible every day These foods provide a person with the proteins needed to develop and repair the body and also to build up strong muscles. They are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fibre and help to keep the immune system active. Legumes include beans, peas, lentils, groundnuts (including peanut butter) and soybeans. When eaten with staple foods the quality of protein is increased. Legumes are a cheaper protein source than animal foods, such as beef and chicken, and should be eaten every day, if possible. Eat animal and milk products regularly Foods from animals and fish should also be eaten as often as you can afford them. They supply good-quality proteins, vitamins and minerals and extra energy. They will help to strengthen muscles and the immune system. These foods include all forms of meat, poultry (birds), fish, eggs and dairy products such as milk, sour milk, buttermilk, yoghurt and cheese. If insects, such as caterpillars or grasshoppers, are part of your diet, they also provide good nutrients. Eat vegetables and fruit every day Vegetables and fruit are an important part of a healthy and balanced meal. They supply the vitamins and minerals that keep the body functioning and the immune system strong. These foods are especially important for people living with HIV/AIDS to fight infection. Eat a wide variety as each one provides different vitamins and minerals.

Skillet Meaty Lasagna

Walang komento :
Do not substitute no-boil lasagna noodles for the traditional, curly-edged lasagna noodles here. Meatloaf mix is a combination of ground beef, pork and veal, sold pre-packaged in many supermarkets. If it’s unavailable, use 1/2 pound each ground pork and ground beef and 85 percent lean ground beef. ingredients 3 (14.5-ounce) cans whole peeled tomatoes 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 medium onion, minced Salt, to taste 3 medium garlic cloves, minced or pressed through a garlic press (about 1 tablespoon) 1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 pound meatloaf mix 10 curly-edged lasagna noodles (about 8 1/2 ounces), broken into 2-inch lengths 2 ounces mozzarella cheese, shredded (1/2 cup) 1/2 ounce Parmesan cheese, grated (1/4 cup) Ground black pepper, to taste 3/4 cup ricotta cheese (see Tip) 3 tablespoons chopped fresh basil leaves directions Pulse the tomatoes with their juice in a food processor until coarsely ground and no large pieces remain, about 12 pulses. Heat the oil in a 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat until shimmering. Add the onion and 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook, stirring often, until softened, 5 to 7 minutes. Stir in the garlic and red pepper flakes and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the ground meat and cook, breaking apart the meat, until lightly browned and no longer pink, 3 to 5 minutes. Scatter the pasta over the meat, then pour the processed tomatoes over the pasta. Cover, increase the heat to medium-high, and cook, stirring often and adjusting the heat to maintain a vigorous simmer, until the pasta is tender, about 20 minutes. Off the heat, stir in 1/2 of the mozzarella and 1/2 of the Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Dot heaping tablespoons of the ricotta over the noodles, then sprinkle with the remaining mozzarella and Parmesan. Cover and let stand off the heat until the cheese melts, 2 to 4 minutes. Sprinkle with the basil and serve. Non-Restaurant Food-Server Job Duties Food-servers who work in a non-restaurant environment may be employed at such places as hospitals and hotel. They use carts or trays to carry and deliver foods, beverages, condiments and utensils. Duties may also include cleaning dishes and utensils. They must also ensure that the right foods are delivered to the correct recipients and according to any instructions or restrictions. Duties might also include preparing food items, such as appetizers, salads, sandwiches or soups. Responsibilities may also include restocking ice, supplies and condiments. Preparing and delivering customers' bills and accepting customers' payments are also common. Additional Qualifications Food-server job qualifications often include holding a high school diploma, though some institutions do not require this. Employers typically provide on-the-job training. Some employers may prefer prior experience or other training to formal schooling. Food-servers must be able to work in a team. They should possess a professional and neat appearance and be able to communicate effectively with customers. Food-servers are expected to provide courteous service to their customers; they might use verbal and written communication techniques. Efficiency is also necessary. Food-servers also need to possess a good memory, as they need to retain customers' orders along with faces and names. Knowledge of foreign languages is useful. Food-servers also need to have familiarity of food safety, food service regulations, health regulations and proper sanitation practices. They must have an awareness of food-handling rules. Employment Outlook and Salary Information Employment growth of 12% was predicted for food and beverage serving and related workers, from 2010-2020, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In 2012, the annual median salary for food preparation and serving related occupations was $18,930, the BLS reported. Food Safety: Serving Topic Overview You can help prevent foodborne illness by taking precautions when serving food. Keep hot foods hot [60°C (140°F) or above] and cold foods cold [4°C (40°F) or below]. Never leave meat, poultry, eggs, fish, or shellfish (raw or cooked) at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the temperature outdoors is above 32°C (90°F), refrigerate within 1 hour. (This is often the case during summer picnics.) Chill leftovers as soon as you finish eating. Store leftovers in small, shallow containers to cool rapidly. Do not reheat food that is contaminated. Reheating does not make it safe. If you are not sure how long a food has been in the refrigerator, throw it out. If you are not sure whether a food is safe, throw it out. When you eat out, be sure that meat is cooked thoroughly and that foods that should be refrigerated, such as puddings and cold cuts, are served cold. Also pay attention to the restaurant environment. If the tables, dinnerware, and washrooms look dirty, the kitchen may be too. It has been firmly established that low maternal intake of folate creates a fetal nutrient deficiency that leads to incomplete development of the fetal nervous system. The critical period for maternal folate intake seems to be the first few weeks of fetal development. Ensuring adequate folate intake during this period is a vexing problem because the fact of pregnancy may not be known even to the mother at this early stage. The confluence of the problem of getting women of childbearing age to eat an adequate amount of folate with the observation that adequate folate helps prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) led to the addition of folic acid to grain foods in the US food supply starting in 1998.1 This strategy has been effective in getting folate to young potential mothers and also in reducing NTDs.2 However, the strategy enhances an otherwise nutrient-poor food (refined grain foods are the primary focus of fortification; whole grain foods are naturally rich in folate) and increases folic acid in purified form to the total population. Eat staple foods with every meal Staple foods should make up the largest part of a meal. These foods are relatively cheap and supply a good amount of energy and some protein. Staples include cereals (such as rice, maize, millet, sorghum, wheat and barley), starchy roots (such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, cassava and yams) and starchy fruit (such as plantains). However, staple foods are not enough to provide all the nutrients the body needs. Other foods must be eaten to provide additional energy, proteins and micronutrients. Eat legumes if possible every day These foods provide a person with the proteins needed to develop and repair the body and also to build up strong muscles. They are good sources of vitamins, minerals and fibre and help to keep the immune system active. Legumes include beans, peas, lentils, groundnuts (including peanut butter) and soybeans. When eaten with staple foods the quality of protein is increased. Legumes are a cheaper protein source than animal foods, such as beef and chicken, and should be eaten every day, if possible. Eat animal and milk products regularly Foods from animals and fish should also be eaten as often as you can afford them. They supply good-quality proteins, vitamins and minerals and extra energy. They will help to strengthen muscles and the immune system. These foods include all forms of meat, poultry (birds), fish, eggs and dairy products such as milk, sour milk, buttermilk, yoghurt and cheese. If insects, such as caterpillars or grasshoppers, are part of your diet, they also provide good nutrients. Eat vegetables and fruit every day Vegetables and fruit are an important part of a healthy and balanced meal. They supply the vitamins and minerals that keep the body functioning and the immune system strong. These foods are especially important for people living with HIV/AIDS to fight infection. Eat a wide variety as each one provides different vitamins and minerals.